Essay about Women in Combat

Women in Combat Women have played a tremendous role in many countries’ armed forces from the past to the present. Women have thoroughly integrated into the armed forces; all positions in the armed forces should be fully accessible to women who can compete with men intellectually and physically.

Yet, many argue that the distinction between combat and non-combat becomes blurred in the context of women warfare (Ladin; Holm, Hoar). In actuality, many women are assigned to jobs that will expose them to enemy attack, and this has been openly acknowledged by the top Pentagon officials. The United States Army has also recognized that women would be deployed in combat zones as an inevitable consequence of their assignments. This was confirmed in the following statement made by then Army Chief of Staff, General Bernad W. Rogers, “Some people believe that women soldiers will not be deployed in the event of hostilities that they are only to be part-time soldier. Women are an essential part of the force; they will deploy with their units and they will serve in the skills in which they have been trained” (Holm).

It appears that women have been integrated into practically every aspect of the military; yet there are some jobs that remain closed to them, mainly, combat specialties (Holm; Hoar). It is over these exclusions that controversy rages. Technically, women are barred by law/ policy from what is defined in narrow terms as direct combat. Each of the United States Armed Services excludes females from active combat. The nature and extent of the exclusion varies with each service.

In today’s military, women were no longer confined to traditional roles in the medical and administrative fields. Almost all military job categories and military occupational specialties (MOS) have been opened to women. They now repair tanks, warplanes, and intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBM’s). They serve on naval vessels that deploy to service ships and submarines of the operational fleet and on Coast Guard cutters operating off United States shores. They serve on missile crews, operate heavy equipment, and direct air traffic. They also provide essential support to combat troops in the field (Holm).

It appears that the United States military is in a position where women are so fully and flexibly involved in the organizational structure, that in a war, it would …

… serving in highly technical roles. Along with the changing role of women in the military, American attitudes a nature and roles of women in our society are also changing. Polls and statistics have shown that there is a clear tendency toward liberalization in terms of women’s roles.Work Cited

Binkin, Martin & Bach J. Shirley, “Women and the Military,” Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution 1977.

Washington, DC: Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Personnel, Dept. of the Army Women in the Army policy review 1982.

Holm, Jeanne. “Women in the Military” An Unfinished RevolutionSchneider, Dorothy & Carol J. Schneider. Sound Off! American Military

Women Speak Out. New York: EP Dutton, 1988.

Hoar, P. William, “Case against Women in Combat,” The New American

8 Feb. 1993. Vol. 9 No. 3

Ladin, Bret. “Army Unit to Bar Women” Globe Newspaper 13 June 2002:

A3. Online. LEXIS-NEXIS Michigan State University. New/Majpap.

29 Nov. 2002.

Scarborough, Rowan. “Women taken our of Army Squads” The Washington

Times 30 May 2002: A01. Online FIRST SEARCH Michigan State

University. New/Majpap. 29 Nov. 2002.